Moving wordpress from shared host to aws ec2

I did an experiment recently trying to move my wordpress website from a shared hosting site to Amazon aws ec2 micro instance (t1). The migration was mostly successful, I did not make the move eventually due to some technical and non-technical reasons. Nonetheless, I would like to share some of the lesson I learned from this process. I followed this blog post form smashmagazine as a blueprint for “moving wordpress”. Note I already have ubuntu installed on ec2, and has setup keys for my laptop.

1) Setup wordpress on new host. This is the link I followed to setup wordpress on ubuntu on my aws ec2. Another useful article is here.

2) Upload files: I used FileZilla (SFTP) for uploading the files. Here is the link regarding setup keys. Note the file permission is also very important to make wordpress work, which is especially important when moving the sites. More on this later.

3) File permission, one thing I noticed quickly is I don’t have any writing privilege after moving, e.g., update plug-ins etc. Did google quite a bit, and tries to change the file permissions using FileZilla. No luck. Eventually I read this from wordpress official doc. Quote:…(a) file ownership: all of your WordPress files must be owned by the user under which your web server executes. In other words, the owner of your WordPress files must match the user under which your web server executes. The web server user (e.g., “apache”, “web”, “www”, “nobody”, etc.) is not necessarily the owner of your WordPress files…

I did “ps -ef|grep httpd” at my ubuntu server, and find the user for apache web server (not “root”). And changed the file owner to this user (via “chown” command).

4) MySQL server crash: I found this happens quite often (as often as once every 3 days). Turns out to be a memory problem for the t1 micro instance and apache web server and mysql fights for the memory, eventually mysql lost. The solution I found is add virtual memory to the system, and reduce the memory requirement for mysql in config file. Eventually I was able to have mysql run as long as 13 days without shutting down. Not ideal, but still meaningful improvement (13 days uptime vs 3). Another idea, people talked about is use a lightweight http server such as this one.

5) MySQL database migration. Found out for large database, php export will not complete, and will end up with some junk html in the database file (.sql), it will fail during import. The workaround is do the export and import in the mysql command line. But I still have one problem with database, it appears the Chinese character got lost during this process. This problem along with the mysql server problem mentioned above, and the relative higher cost of AWS compared to shared host, made me decide to not switch at this time.

Other links:
Setup php/mysql, and phpMyAdmin.

Craig Emerson has an up-to-date article on this topic WordPress CloudFront CDN Setup Using W3 Total Cache.